DISEC Committee

Disarmament and International Security


Topics

Arms Race in Asia

Arms Race in Asia

Outside of the Middle East, Asia currently has been enjoying interstate peace and not experienced any full-scale war between different countries since 1979—when China briefly invaded Vietnam— though there are still plenty of internal insurgencies. (There was a limited war between India and Pakistan in 1999, called the Kargil War, but this was very limited in scope.) Despite this, the continent is in a middle of an arms race, as reflected by the fact that Asia-Pacific is bought about 46% of global arms imports in 2011-2015, and total expenditure in 2016 is more than double the 2007 level. However, we can’t say that there is a classic arms race like those between Britain and Germany in early 20th century or between the U.S. and Soviet Union in the latter half of the 20th century. The increase in arms spending in the region is happening in the context of a very complex situation and involves multiple actors with sometimes overlapping and sometimes divergent interests.

Limiting Means of Terrorist Financing

Limiting Means of Terrorist Financing

In theory, effective financial controls can have important effects for the purposes of investigation, monitoring, prevention, and reduction of terrorist operations. Financial intelligence, such as tracking contributors to charitable organisation linked to terrorism, is more reliable than alternative forms of intelligence. In practice, regulators face a hard time devising effective financial controls—the lack of information forces them to make several assumptions in their policies to counter the financing of terrorism (CFT). One of these assumptions is the homogeneity of terrorist organisations, i.e. regulatory measures designed to disrupt the financing of terrorism are assumed to be equally effective against various organized groups (from virtual networks to decentralized cells). Likewise, strategies to combat organizations with limited goals or geographical presence, such as IRA, are assumed to be effective to combat transnational network like al Qaeda and its associates. Yet, these organisations differ in their goals, structure and form, and consequently, in their weaknesses. Therefore, smarter financial controls, which are tailored to the terrorists’ nature, should be deliberated. Nevertheless, such a measure is likely to be costly to the state involved, in terms of intelligence gathering, decision making, and implementation. Therefore, countering the financing of terrorism is not an agenda with straightforward answers, as it requires understanding of each state’s interests, incentives, and resources, before the question of policy-making can be embarked upon.

'Chinese honor guard' photo was released by the United States Air Force. 'IRPGF fighters during the campaign.' photo was taken by IRPGF and is used under CC BY 4.0 license.

Chairs

Azli Azahari

Azli Azahari

My name is Ahmad Azli bin Azahari (I go by Azli) and I am currently a PhD student in Materials Engineering at the University of Nottingham. I am originally from Malaysia but have also lived in Saudi Arabia and Bahrain during my secondary school years which allowed me to be more comfortable in international settings. I started MUN since 2014 when I was doing my undergraduate studies. I immediately fell in love with it because being international is the whole point of getting involved in MUN and the debates and compromise integral to MUN are really quite fun and engaging. Since then I have been to a number of conferences throughout the UK and thoroughly enjoyed them all.

Prashant Garg

Prashant Garg

Prashant is a final-year economics student at Cardiff University. He started taking part in university MUN two years ago at ManMun. Since then he has unfortunately been addicted to this highly-rewarding activity. He has attended several conferences in different committees in different capacities acting as a delegate chair and secretariat member. Prashant is a passionate advocate of civil liberties and human rights and has started a university society that pushes for it. He is therefore excited to co-chair DISEC this December where he expects delegates to understand the humanitarian implications of maintaining international security.